The Relationship Between Dual Sovereignty and Double Jeopardy: the Trials of Tim Hennis

Kelsey Braford (PO ‘22) The Founding Fathers wrote into the fifth amendment protections against double jeopardy --  i.e. being tried...
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The Relationship Between Dual Sovereignty and Double Jeopardy: the Trials of Tim Hennis

Letter from the Editor-in-Chief, Vol. 7 No. 2

Dear Reader, Welcome to Volume 7, Number 2 of the Claremont Journal of Law and Public Policy! We received a...
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Letter from the Editor-in-Chief, Vol. 7 No.1

Dear Reader, Welcome to the fifteenth edition — Volume 7, Number 1 — of the Claremont Journal of Law and...
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Letter from the Editor-in-Chief, Vol. 7 No.1

Why the “Gay Panic Defense” is Discriminatory

Kelsey Braford (PO '22) Many people are unaware of the existence of a discriminatory legal strategy dubbed the “gay panic...
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Why the “Gay Panic Defense” is Discriminatory

The University of Washington Must Take Further Action Against Coronavirus

David Ruiz (PO '23) I, along with three other students from the Claremont Colleges in Southern California, was scheduled to...
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The University of Washington Must Take Further Action Against Coronavirus

“Yankee Hindutva” and the 2020 Election

Rya Jetha (PO '23) I am an American Indian raised in Mumbai, with an American passport, currently attending college in...
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“Yankee Hindutva” and the 2020 Election

A New Approach to the Right to Privacy

Rachel Oda (PO ’20)  Guest Contributor  A New Approach to the Right to Privacy    The right to privacy, properly understood, is...
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A New Approach to the Right to Privacy

What Ireland’s Election Chaos Means for Britain

By Andy Liu (HMC ‘23) For nearly eighty years, control of the Oireachtas (Irish parliament) has been passed back and...
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What Ireland’s Election Chaos Means for Britain

How Iran’s coronavirus outbreak could spark a Middle Eastern epidemic

By Christopher Tan (PZ ‘21) Crippled by US sanctions, embroiled in political unrest and rattled by the death of its...
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How Iran’s coronavirus outbreak could spark a Middle Eastern epidemic

The Coronavirus Outbreak: Do You Hear the People Sing?

By Shuyan Yan (PO '23) On Feb.7th, Chinese social media saw a massive outpouring of outrage and grief due to...
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The Coronavirus Outbreak: Do You Hear the People Sing?

India’s Farmer Suicide Crisis: Why Government Policy Is Failing

Rya Jetha (PO '23) Five years ago, at a political rally in Delhi, Gajender Singh climbed a neem tree near...
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India’s Farmer Suicide Crisis: Why Government Policy Is Failing

Taking Stock of Iowa’s Chaotic Caucus

Aditya Bhalla (PO '23) Last week’s Iowa caucus was supposed to be the emphatic beginning of a widely anticipated electoral...
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Taking Stock of Iowa’s Chaotic Caucus

Understanding the Swamp: A Basic Look at Trump’s Deregulatory Crusade

Nathan Tran (PO '23) In 2017, Gallup found that 45% of Americans — including 68% of Republicans and 20% of...
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Understanding the Swamp: A Basic Look at Trump’s Deregulatory Crusade

Welcome to the Journal

The Claremont Journal of Law and Public Policy is an undergraduate journal published by students of the Claremont Colleges. Student writers and editorial staff work together to produce substantive legal and policy analysis that is accessible to audiences at the five colleges and beyond. The CJLPP is also proud to spearhead the Intercollegiate Law Journal project. Together, we intend to build a community of students passionately engaged in learning and debate about the critical issues of our time!

Recent Posts: The Claremont Journal of Law and Public Policy

School Desegregation Law: How the Supreme Court Went Colorblind

School Desegregation Law: How the Supreme Court Went Colorblind

Rowan McGarry-Williams (PO ’21) The integration of American public schools, once at the center of education reform, today tends to be overshadowed by debates over charter schools, accountability, and funding. Despite extensive research on the widespread benefits of integration, our schools are more racially and economically segregated now than they have been in decades, with…

The Arrogance of Wealth

The Arrogance of Wealth

Elias Van Emmerick (PO ’21) Wealth and income inequality have been oft-cited issues in the runup to the 2020 Presidential election. The United States consistently ranks near the top of all developed countries in both metrics, and inequality has generally trended upwards for multiple decades. Amongst news of historically low unemployment and all-time highs in…

Google Wins Temporary Victory in Data Rights Court Case

Google Wins Temporary Victory in Data Rights Court Case

By Andy Liu (HMC ’23) The European Union has a reputation for stringent data rights regulations, with the 2018 passing of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) further strengthening personal data rights and data protection across member states. However, a recent ruling in the European Court of Justice (ECJ) in a case between Google and CNIL, a…

The Advent of the Adpocalypse

The Advent of the Adpocalypse

By Izzy Davis (PO ’22) In its burgeoning state, YouTube was characterized as the “wild-west” of online video, known for everything from anthropomorphized oranges to viral videos of people eating spoonfuls of cinnamon, with no shortage of controversial content. While a romanticized view of the democratic free-for-all that was once YouTube, the stark difference between…

Voice of the Opposition: An Interview with Leni Robredo, Vice President of the Philippines

Voice of the Opposition: An Interview with Leni Robredo, Vice President of the Philippines

Conducted by Rafael Santa Maria (PO ’20). Maria Leonor “Leni” Gerona Robredo has served as the 14th Vice President of the Philippines since June 2016. As per the Constitution of the Philippines, she ran for the Office of the Vice President separately from the main presidential election and therefore did not run with now-President Rodrigo…