A Domestic Assessment of the Global Compact for Migration

By Daisy Ni (PO ’21) In the summer of 2018, the United Nations­­ finalized the text of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration, the first international agreement laying out a comprehensive framework addressing international migration. The Trump administration, however, withdrew from participation in December of 2017, citing the Compact’s incompatibility with national…

Vigilante Justice in America

By Daisy Ni (PO ’21) “A government of the people, for the people, and by the people” emblemizes American democracy, and indeed many other democracies around the world today. The United States’ government draws its legitimacy from its citizens, holding a duty first and foremost to the population that constitutes it. Popular sovereignty, however, can…

Amidst Attack, a Legal Defense of the Right to Asylum

By Daisy Ni (PO ’21) In light of the caravan of migrants, thousands in number, travelling from Central America toward the United States, President Trump has released a new series of startling anti-immigration policy Tweets, including the idea of banning asylum seekers. The administration has already taken stepsover the past few years to reduce the…

Ranked Choice Voting: a More Democratic System?

By Daisy Ni (PO ’21) The debate surrounding the merits of our electoral system has been intensifying over the past few years. Under the current plurality system (also called winner-take-all or first-past-the-post), each voter votes for only one candidate, with the candidate who polls more votes than any other candidate elected. The plurality system, however,…

Breaking Down the “Broken Windows” Theory

By Daisy Ni (PO ’21) First introduced by George Kelling and James Wilson in 1982, the broken windows theory transformed the field of criminology. Writing in an Atlantic article, Kelling and Wilson claimed that “if a window in a building is broken and is left unrepaired, all the rest of the windows will soon be…

The Role of “We the People” in the Courtroom

By Daisy Ni (PO ’21) As the highest court of the land, the Supreme Court was created alongside our executive and legislative branches to keep their power in check. To do so, the Court’s role requires an immunity from political pressure. The appointment process and life-long tenures of judges, for example, remove the pressures of…