The Reward Work Act and Worker Compensation

By James Dail (CMC ’21) One of the most persistent problems that the U.S. has faced over the past several decades is the persistent lack of wage growth. Adjusting for inflation, most U.S. workers have not received a raise since the 1970s. Though this has been a long-term phenomenon, this trend is especially puzzling at…

The Great Divorce: Inflation and Unemployment

By James Dail (CMC ’20) When the great recession ended in June 2009, something unusual began to happen to the US economy. Both the unemployment rate and the inflation rate were simultaneously low, which is unusual, as they are never supposed to occur simultaneously. While having both a low unemployment rate and inflation rate is…

The Truth of the Trade War

By James Dail (CMC ’20) One of President Trump’s main campaign promise was to revive the depleted US manufacturing sector and bring back lost jobs by implementing tariffs. Even today, this is one of the President’s main talking points whenever he goes to a campaign rally in an area that used to have strong employment…

Regulating Social Media as a Public Utility

By James Dail (CMC ’20) On April 10th and 11th, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified before Congress over the revelation that Cambridge Analytica, a British Data Analytics firm, compromised the data of more than 50 million Facebook users in order to try and influence the 2016 Presidential Election. The hearings were about Facebook’s ability to…

Noncompete Clauses and the Depression of Wages

By James Dail (CMC ’20) One of the most consequential macroeconomic phenomenon of the past half-century has been widespread wage stagnation. From 1979 to 2016, wages have barely grown at all (and in some cases have declined) for the lowest sixty percent of workers by income distribution. The average yearly rate of inflation from 1979…