OPINON: Moving Back to an Apolitical Executive & Reclaiming the Moral Branch of Government

By Hutchinson Fann (PO ’21) As Democratic presidential candidates emerge for a chance to battle President Trump in 2020, it is strange to remember that under our original Constitution, one of these people could instead become the next Vice President. Before the 12th Amendment was passed in 1804, electors cast votes for two candidates, and…

Have You Any Decency? Bucklew v. Precythe and the Future of the Eighth Amendment

By Alex Simard (PO’22) Content Warning: This article, as it centers on the death penalty and a man condemned to it, contains depictions of gun violence, murder, and domestic and sexual violence, including rape. It also contains graphic depictions of petitioner’s medical condition and brief depictions of 17th- and 18th-century modes of punishment, including torture.…

Exposure of Cruel and Unusual Punishment in Alabama Seeks to Improve Prison Conditions

By Musa Kamara (PO’22) The Eighth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution conveys three major provisions, one of which is perhaps one of the most recognizable constitutional tenets in popular culture. The Amendment guarantees protection from excessive bail, protection from fines, and – most notably– protection from cruel and unusual punishment. The idea of cruel and…

A Backdoor to Electoral College Reform Sees New Hope

By Francis Northwood (PO ’21) On March 15th, Governor Jared Polis of Colorado signed onto the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact (NPVIC), making the state the 12th member-state of the compact, and the first “purple” member (that is, a state not solidly Democrat or Republican). Proponents of the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact argue that…