Finnish Elections Test Public Support for Welfare Reform after Center-Right Government Resigns

By Katya Pollock (PO ’21) On March 8th, Finland’s center-right coalition government, led by Prime Minister Juha Sipilä, resigned after failing to pass a promised reform of healthcare programs. A dramatic rise in the population’s old-age dependency ratio and recession-level labor force participation rates have tightened financial pressure on the country’s healthcare, pension, child-care, and…

A Backdoor to Electoral College Reform Sees New Hope

By Francis Northwood (PO ’21) On March 15th, Governor Jared Polis of Colorado signed onto the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact (NPVIC), making the state the 12th member-state of the compact, and the first “purple” member (that is, a state not solidly Democrat or Republican). Proponents of the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact argue that…

Tuition, Room, and Borders: CMC’s Need-Aware Admissions for International Students

By Angela Sun HMC ‘19 Claremont McKenna College (CMC) prides itself on being a need-blind institution. This means that applicants to the college are admitted solely on merit, without consideration of their ability to pay tuition costs. However, this label only extends to U.S. citizens and permanent residents. For international students, CMC weighs a student’s…

Hungary’s Attack on Academic Freedom

By Kimberly Tuttle (CMC ’19) Central European University (CEU), one of the leading American accredited universities in Central Europe, is being forced out of Budapest, Hungary. In April 2017, the Hungarian Parliament changed the country’s higher education laws, making it illegal for some independent universities to operate. The new law requires universities registered outside of…