Socialism in the UK: Britain’s Labour Party touts an alternative to Boris Johnson

By Christopher Tan (PZ ‘21) Three years after it voted to leave the European Union, the United Kingdom continues to face more questions than answers over its uncertain future. Since 2016, Britain has dumped two prime ministers, limped through two bruising election campaigns (with a third on the horizon), and seen a rapid decline in…

OPINON: Moving Back to an Apolitical Executive & Reclaiming the Moral Branch of Government

By Hutchinson Fann (PO ’21) As Democratic presidential candidates emerge for a chance to battle President Trump in 2020, it is strange to remember that under our original Constitution, one of these people could instead become the next Vice President. Before the 12th Amendment was passed in 1804, electors cast votes for two candidates, and…

Trump and Israel: Was Netanyahu’s victory influenced by American action?

By Francis Northwood (PO ’21) Last Tuesday, April 9th, Benjamin Netanyahu defeated his greatest challenger yet, Benny Gantz, in a tightly contested election watched by the entire world. It was decided by fewer than 20,000 votes. While the geopolitical implications of this election are serious, Netanyahu’s election itself deserves greater analysis. Netanyahu was just indicted…

A Backdoor to Electoral College Reform Sees New Hope

By Francis Northwood (PO ’21) On March 15th, Governor Jared Polis of Colorado signed onto the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact (NPVIC), making the state the 12th member-state of the compact, and the first “purple” member (that is, a state not solidly Democrat or Republican). Proponents of the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact argue that…