Candidate Catchup: Climate Policies of Presidential Hopefuls

By Lucie Abele PO ’22 With increasingly unpredictable weather patterns across the globe, from raging wildfires in California and Australia to droughts and tropical storms, climate is among the political issues that matter most to voters as of December 2019. The climate policies of each of six potential presidential candidates, selected from the frontrunners of…

Does the Civil Rights Act of 1964 protect from discrimination based on sexual orientation?

Conducted by Rafael Santa Maria (PO ’20) It may come as a surprise to advocates and allies of the LGBTQ+ community that this question has not been resolved yet. Despite the considerable progress made in the continuing battle for equality over the last few decades, it seems hard to believe that sexual orientation remains unrecognized…

Government Regulation and Big Tech: Why Internal Systems Aren’t Enough

By Aden Siebel (PO ’21) With an increasingly complex field of technological privacy and ethics concerns, government regulation of tech giants has made surprising progress. International lawmakers have implemented significant policy and punished these companies, and while the U.S. federal system has been slower, Congress has increasingly threatened executives and called for industry reform. This…

The Advent of the Adpocalypse

By Izzy Davis (PO ’22) In its burgeoning state, YouTube was characterized as the “wild-west” of online video, known for everything from anthropomorphized oranges to viral videos of people eating spoonfuls of cinnamon, with no shortage of controversial content. While a romanticized view of the democratic free-for-all that was once YouTube, the stark difference between…

Socialism in the UK: Britain’s Labour Party touts an alternative to Boris Johnson

By Christopher Tan (PZ ‘21) Three years after it voted to leave the European Union, the United Kingdom continues to face more questions than answers over its uncertain future. Since 2016, Britain has dumped two prime ministers, limped through two bruising election campaigns (with a third on the horizon), and seen a rapid decline in…

Heat of the Summer: An Analysis of the Hong Kong Protests

By Christopher Tan (PZ ’21) Hong Kong summers are unforgiving. Crowds of people clog narrow streets alongside buses and trams. Dense heat, amplified by the region’s notorious humidity, is trapped between canyons of skyscrapers, leaving citizens to seek respite in tiny apartments. If the sun is not out, typhoons and heavy rain showers batter the territory,…