Vigilante Justice in America

By Daisy Ni (PO ’21) “A government of the people, for the people, and by the people” emblemizes American democracy, and indeed many other democracies around the world today. The United States’ government draws its legitimacy from its citizens, holding a duty first and foremost to the population that constitutes it. Popular sovereignty, however, can…

The Reward Work Act and Worker Compensation

By James Dail (CMC ’21) One of the most persistent problems that the U.S. has faced over the past several decades is the persistent lack of wage growth. Adjusting for inflation, most U.S. workers have not received a raise since the 1970s. Though this has been a long-term phenomenon, this trend is especially puzzling at…

Following the Far Right: The Rise of Conservative Populism in Europe and America

By Jordan Hollinger (PZ ’19) During the watershed election cycle of 2016, American society was brusquely familiarized with an organized populist movement, one heavily influenced by the tenets of far-right ideologies. Throughout the Republican primaries, Trump’s bombastic rhetoric continuously garnered support from both voters and politicians alike, establishing for Trump a reputation as a demagogue…

Breaking Down the “Broken Windows” Theory

By Daisy Ni (PO ’21) First introduced by George Kelling and James Wilson in 1982, the broken windows theory transformed the field of criminology. Writing in an Atlantic article, Kelling and Wilson claimed that “if a window in a building is broken and is left unrepaired, all the rest of the windows will soon be…

The Truth of the Trade War

By James Dail (CMC ’20) One of President Trump’s main campaign promise was to revive the depleted US manufacturing sector and bring back lost jobs by implementing tariffs. Even today, this is one of the President’s main talking points whenever he goes to a campaign rally in an area that used to have strong employment…