Political Interference Threatens Limited Right to Abortion in Argentina

By Katya Pollock (PO’21) Last month, an 11-year-old in Argentina underwent a procedure similar to a caesarian section after officials in the northwestern province of Tucumán obstructed her right to a legal interruption of pregnancy (ILE). The girl, addressed using the pseudonym Lucía, had allegedly been raped by her grandmother’s 65-year-old partner. The case comes…

The Anti-Vax Movement: A Legal Perspective

By Musa Kamara (PO’22) The American anti-vaccination (anti-vax) movement found its roots when British anti-vaccinationist William Tebb visited the United States in 1879. Following Tebb’s visit, anti-vax groups in California, Illinois, and Wisconsin began to form and have continued to develop to this day. In 1998, another British anti-vaccinationist, Andrew Wakefield, published a study that…

The Dark Underbelly of Corporate Philanthropy

By Katya Pollock (PO’21) At the World Economic Forum held in Davos, Switzerland this January, Dutch historian Rutger Bregman shocked fellow panelists and audience members with his harsh criticism of philanthropic efforts to address inequality. Berman lambasted the global corporate elite for initiating “stupid philanthropy schemes” which, he argues, serve only to distract from the rich’s…

Future of the Draft: Could men’s rights and feminists groups score a shared victory?

By Rafael Santa Maria (PO ’20) A Texas court ruling might end the Military Selective System’s male-only draft policy. In a potentially groundbreaking decision, Judge Gray H. Miller of the federal court for the Southern District of Texas ruled that the military draft’s exclusive targeting of men is unconstitutional. In his opinion, Judge Miller notes…