Re-evaluating the Dodd-Frank Act

By Anna Yu (PO ’19) Since the Great Recession in 2008, the Dodd-Frank Act has been a name widely known among the finance world and the public. As a key piece of legislation intended to regulate the financial industry, what exactly does it consist of and what role does it play today? Sponsored by Senator…

Breathalyzers and Blood Tests: A Review of Birchfield v. North Dakota

Allie Carter (CMC ’19) Birchfield v. North Dakota (2016) raised the question of the constitutionality of police testing of the blood alcohol concentration of drivers. The Court focused on whether states can criminalize an individual’s refusal to submit to a blood alcohol or breathalyzer test. Ultimately, the Supreme Court came to the conclusion that, under…

The Future of Internet Regulation

By Arthur Chang  (PO ’20) The internet is not typically thought of as highly regulated. Nevertheless, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), which regulates the internet in addition to other aspects of interstate communications, is currently entangled in a heated debate over net neutrality and a free market for internet. Net neutrality is the principle that internet…

Detroit’s Development: A Story of Gentrification

Dina Rosin (CMC ’20) Gentrification is broadly considered the process in which a neighborhood increases in property values, as wealthier people move in, which consequently pushes lower-income residents out. Many consider gentrification to be very controversial. While some argue that it improves a city, making it safer and more economically sound, others argue that it…

Dodd-Frank and the Profitability of Major Banks

By James Dail (CMC ’20) A group of Republicans have just passed a resolution of disapproval addressing the proposed repeal of a regulation that benefits the financial industry over consumers. The proposed repeal would prevent consumers for filing class action lawsuits against financial companies. Though it might not be as newsworthy as some of their…

Dreaming of DACA

By Jeremiah Cha (UCSD ’19) Introduction The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program granted certain deportation protections as well as work eligibility to individuals who entered the United States as minors. Nearly 800,000 people were protected under the DACA program.[1] On September 5, 2017, the Trump administration made a significant and controversial decision to end…