Government Regulation and Big Tech: Why Internal Systems Aren’t Enough

By Aden Siebel (PO ’21) With an increasingly complex field of technological privacy and ethics concerns, government regulation of tech giants has made surprising progress. International lawmakers have implemented significant policy and punished these companies, and while the U.S. federal system has been slower, Congress has increasingly threatened executives and called for industry reform. This…

School Desegregation Law: How the Supreme Court Went Colorblind

Rowan McGarry-Williams (PO ’21) The integration of American public schools, once at the center of education reform, today tends to be overshadowed by debates over charter schools, accountability, and funding. Despite extensive research on the widespread benefits of integration, our schools are more racially and economically segregated now than they have been in decades, with…

The Arrogance of Wealth

Elias Van Emmerick (PO ’21) Wealth and income inequality have been oft-cited issues in the runup to the 2020 Presidential election. The United States consistently ranks near the top of all developed countries in both metrics, and inequality has generally trended upwards for multiple decades. Amongst news of historically low unemployment and all-time highs in…

OPINION: A Recent Rule Change to Title X Will Harm Patients

Maggie Bynum (SC ‘20) On March 3rd, 2019 the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) submitted a final rule to the National Register that will have a detrimental effect on reproductive health services in the United States. The rule outlines several changes to Title X, also known as the Family Planning Program.  Since its…

Letter from the Editor-in-Chief, Vol. 7 No.1

Dear Reader, Welcome to the fifteenth edition — Volume 7, Number 1 — of the Claremont Journal of Law and Public Policy! Volume 7, Number 1 includes analyses of forced institutionalization, China’s Belt and Road Initiative, facial recognition technology, and more. We are also excited to bring you an interview with Shadi Hamid, a Senior…

The Special Counsel’s Structural Dilemma

By Francis Northwood (PO ’21) When a president does something very wrong, a special counsel is often tasked with an investigation. This was the case with Watergate, the Iran-Contra Affair, and Whitewater. However, the special counsel is appointed by the Attorney General, which gives it strange status. It is controlled by the executive branch, but…

Dancing the Line: Cooper v. Harris, a Landmark Decision on Gerrymandering and Judicial Implementation of Civil Rights

By Lea Kayali (PO ‘19) Race matters. Police brutality, immigration, and criminal justice reforms—these hot-button debates reflect how racial issues are front and center in American politics. As racialized politics percolate through party platforms,[1] Americans’ political identity is increasingly determined by demographics. White nationalism is on the rise in the self-proclaimed “alt-right,” and identity politics…