How police get away with it: an evaluation of police contracts, internal investigations, qualified immunity, and indemnification

By Haidee Clauer (PO '22) Racism and anti-Blackness have played a long and persistent role in the history of the...
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How police get away with it: an evaluation of police contracts, internal investigations, qualified immunity, and indemnification

Lessons from The New Jim Crow: Should We Defund the Police?

Rya Jetha (PO '23) Racism and anti-Blackness have played a long and persistent role in the history of the United...
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Lessons from The New Jim Crow: Should We Defund the Police?

CJLPP Statement on Black Lives Matter

The Claremont Journal of Law and Public Policy expresses our solidarity with the Black community and unequivocally believes that Black...
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CJLPP Statement on Black Lives Matter

Letter from the Editor-in-Chief, Vol. 7 No. 2

Dear Reader, Welcome to Volume 7, Number 2 of the Claremont Journal of Law and Public Policy! We received a...
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How the Debate Over Reopening Has Agitated Age-Long Questions About the Future of Hawaii’s Economy

By Camryn Fujita (SCR 21')Guest Contributor As many states across the nation begin to re-open businesses to mitigate the economic...
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How the Debate Over Reopening Has Agitated Age-Long Questions About the Future of Hawaii’s Economy

40 Years of Superseding Due Process and Trial: Preventive Detention in India-Administered Kashmir

By: Manisha Bhau (National Law University Delhi '21) Guest Contributor Introduction: Preventive detention simply refers to the detention of a...
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40 Years of Superseding Due Process and Trial: Preventive Detention in India-Administered Kashmir

Responding to COVID-19 in Low-Income Nations

By: Andy Liu (HMC '23) Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, nations across the world have rapidly intervened to...
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Responding to COVID-19 in Low-Income Nations

Chinese Exclusion Act in the Age of COVID-19

By: Calla Li (PO ’22) May 6, 2020; marks the 138-year-anniversary of the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, the only...
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Chinese Exclusion Act in the Age of COVID-19

Food Policy: A Comparative Analysis of Local Food Policies versus Federal Government Policies

By: Elease Willis (PO '22) As a developed country that places a premium on technological innovation and globalization, the United...
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Food Policy: A Comparative Analysis of Local Food Policies versus Federal Government Policies

Xenophobia: An American tradition amidst the coronavirus

By Aditya Bhalla (PO '23) Over the last few months, the coronavirus pandemic has caused a marked increase in racially...
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Xenophobia: An American tradition amidst the coronavirus

How COVID-19 could tear the European Union apart

By Christopher Tan (PZ ‘21) In Milan, hospitals have been overwhelmed by a deluge of patients. In Madrid, authorities turned...
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How COVID-19 could tear the European Union apart

Welcome to the Journal

The Claremont Journal of Law and Public Policy is an undergraduate journal published by students of the Claremont Colleges. Student writers and editorial staff work together to produce substantive legal and policy analysis that is accessible to audiences at the five colleges and beyond. The CJLPP is also proud to spearhead the Intercollegiate Law Journal project. Together, we intend to build a community of students passionately engaged in learning and debate about the critical issues of our time!

Recent Posts: The Claremont Journal of Law and Public Policy

School Desegregation Law: How the Supreme Court Went Colorblind

School Desegregation Law: How the Supreme Court Went Colorblind

Rowan McGarry-Williams (PO ’21) The integration of American public schools, once at the center of education reform, today tends to be overshadowed by debates over charter schools, accountability, and funding. Despite extensive research on the widespread benefits of integration, our schools are more racially and economically segregated now than they have been in decades, with…

The Arrogance of Wealth

The Arrogance of Wealth

Elias Van Emmerick (PO ’21) Wealth and income inequality have been oft-cited issues in the runup to the 2020 Presidential election. The United States consistently ranks near the top of all developed countries in both metrics, and inequality has generally trended upwards for multiple decades. Amongst news of historically low unemployment and all-time highs in…

Google Wins Temporary Victory in Data Rights Court Case

Google Wins Temporary Victory in Data Rights Court Case

By Andy Liu (HMC ’23) The European Union has a reputation for stringent data rights regulations, with the 2018 passing of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) further strengthening personal data rights and data protection across member states. However, a recent ruling in the European Court of Justice (ECJ) in a case between Google and CNIL, a…

The Advent of the Adpocalypse

The Advent of the Adpocalypse

By Izzy Davis (PO ’22) In its burgeoning state, YouTube was characterized as the “wild-west” of online video, known for everything from anthropomorphized oranges to viral videos of people eating spoonfuls of cinnamon, with no shortage of controversial content. While a romanticized view of the democratic free-for-all that was once YouTube, the stark difference between…

Voice of the Opposition: An Interview with Leni Robredo, Vice President of the Philippines

Voice of the Opposition: An Interview with Leni Robredo, Vice President of the Philippines

Conducted by Rafael Santa Maria (PO ’20). Maria Leonor “Leni” Gerona Robredo has served as the 14th Vice President of the Philippines since June 2016. As per the Constitution of the Philippines, she ran for the Office of the Vice President separately from the main presidential election and therefore did not run with now-President Rodrigo…